Welcome to my website!

I am a freelance story artist and animator currently based in Scotland. At the moment I’m looking for more work.

Scroll down to see my day-to-day updates, sketches and life drawing. Choose from the menu above to view my portfolio, storyboards, and showreels, see my most recent projects, or get in contact.

Featured post

This is a little ink illustration I drew for a friend’s birthday card. I coloured it in Photoshop, but I think I prefer it in black and white.


It’s taken me a couple of weeks to put these online! A lovely session with Ana modelling. This time I felt a bit more comfortable using conte pastel to draw.

The snow is beginning to melt, leaving icy pools of water and slush. As I struggled through it on a walk this afternoon I thought it would be a good subject for today’s study.


Here are some quick pen studies of the views from the train today – mist in front of trees, stubble in the snow, hedges, ploughed fields, footprints, snow melting.

I struggled with this one. Choosing the colour and getting the texture right was difficult, and I don’t feel I’ve completely succeeded in either area. This was a study of a canvas bag. I guess I need to paint more cloth!


I’ve realised that the way I use Photoshop to storyboard isn’t that well known. This way of working uses Frame Animation within the Timeline panel. It takes a short while to organise new shortcuts and change a few settings, but once that’s done it’s easy to add new frames and scroll through the storyboard. Most importantly, it’s simple to export.

I have used this technique in CS5 and CC. This tutorial uses Photoshop CC 2018 on a Mac.

The size of the canvas doesn’t matter. I generally use a 1920×1080 pixel canvas if I’m boarding in 16:9; the inbuilt Film & Video presets can be helpful. Like with any Photoshop file, a large canvas area plus lots of layers can become unwieldy.

Setting up the document

Open the Timeline panel by going to Window > Timeline.


Click ‘Create Frame Animation’.


In the bottom left-hand corner of the Timeline panel there will be a single frame. Click the little arrow in its bottom right-hand corner.


Change the amount to 1.0, or one second. This is important because in order to export the frame rate is set at 1fps.


Click the ‘Duplicate Frames’ button to add two more frames.


Click the button in the top right corner of the Timeline panel.


If ‘New Layers Visible in All Frames’ is checked, uncheck it.


I like to save a copy of the document as a template.

Setting up shortcuts

By default, Photoshop does not assign any shortcuts for Frames in the Timeline panel. Click Edit > Keyboard Shortcuts.


Next to ‘Shortcuts For:’ choose ‘Panel Menus’.


Scroll down to ‘Timeline (Frames)’ and open the dropdown menu.


I set shortcuts for ‘New Frame’, ‘Next Frame’ and ‘Previous Frame’. Choose whatever keystrokes suit you best. I don’t worry too much about what the shortcut is as I then assign them to buttons on my Cintiq.


Click ‘OK’.

To assign the shortcuts to a Wacom tablet, open the Wacom Tablet Preferences. This can be accessed either through the Radial Menu or, on a Mac, System Preferences.


Select ‘Functions’.


Click the drop-down menu next to the button. Select Keyboard > Keystroke …


Add the keystroke and assign it a name.


Click ‘OK’.

It’s worth testing the buttons a few times, to make sure they’re working as expected. Usually if I have problems it’s because I’ve made a mistake in entering the keystroke.


This is not a tutorial on how to storyboard, but I’ll give a few hints about how to use this setup.

First, don’t add any layers on the first frame. Always leave it blank. I like to have both the first and last frame blank.

Add a layer to draw. I like to keep my layers reasonably tidy, by sorting all the layers for one shot into one folder.




It’s easy to reuse layers across several frames. As long as you don’t transform the layer (resize, rotate, etc.) you can move it without duplicating or redrawing. This progression was a simple case of duplicating the frame, then moving the position of the figure. If I rotate the layer with the figure on frame 4, it also rotates on the other frames. It’s the same if I decide to add to the drawing.


As creating a new frame duplicates the current frame, you need to turn off the layers you don’t want to see in it. (This is when grouping layers can be particularly useful.) Then, add a new layer to draw.



Go to File > Export > Render Video …


Change the name and save location.


Change the dropdown menu from ‘Adobe Media Encoder’ to ‘Photoshop Image Sequence’.


Change the Frame Rate to ‘Custom’ and enter 1 fps.


Render Video automatically exports all frames, but it is possible to select a group of frames on the Timeline and then export the selected frames only.

Once you’ve finished adding the information you need, click ‘Render’.


If only a few images have exported, or some have been exported two or more times, check that the frames are all set at 1 sec and that you are also exporting at 1 fps.

This is a very quick walkthrough of the process, so please let me know if you think there’s something I haven’t covered. Ask any questions below!

While on a walk with the dog this afternoon I looked out for interesting things to draw and decided on this juxtaposition between snow, ice and water.


If you’ve been following me for a few years you may remember that back in 2015 I drew ‘Pieces of Sky’, small squares of the sky I saw that day. (Here’s an example.) I’ve been thinking about starting to draw small colour studies again, as I enjoyed the challenge. However I feel only drawing the sky is perhaps a bit limiting, so I’ve set myself a new goal within the same guidelines of a 500×500 pixel canvas. I’ll continue to take inspiration from life, but it will now be from anywhere.

It’s been a very grey, snowy day so unfortunately there is very little colour anywhere. Today’s ‘Study Square’ shows some of the snow piled up outside my window.  I like how mountainous the shapes are despite the fact it’s only about a foot in height!


One of the good things about taking the train is getting the chance to doodle away. Here are a few drawings from a recent trip. Mostly I just scribble, but the first group below are some characters from an old story of mine. I’ve been wondering about storyboarding the idea, or developing it further in some way.


Last week I had a good life drawing session with lots of dynamic and interesting poses. I drew in conte pastel for the first half, which was an attempt to shake me up a bit and loosen my drawings. Though everything felt a bit messy I think it was good as an exercise. I’ve noticed I’m getting much slower: I need to get back in the habit of regular gesture drawing to counteract this!

Early last year I created some concept art for a feature film. Unfortunately the prop I worked on has since been cut from the story, but I’m able to share it here with you.

The first three images were quite general explorations to get a feel for what the director wanted. I enjoyed thinking about the ‘why’ of each knife – why it was created, why it was made of that material, why there was decoration (or not).

There’s a page of quick rock studies, as the knife was to have been placed in a stone.

After I received feedback from the director I developed the ‘plain’ knife option further, extending the blade and creating different options for the hilt and sheath. These can be seen in the last few images below.

I would have liked to develop the knife further still, but (irritatingly) the story is better without it!

My first drawing session after Christmas, and I was quite rusty … it took me a while to warm up. We had a break just as I was beginning to feel I could draw again!

What with packing up and moving across most of the country and Christmas and New Year, it’s taken me a while to post some of my life drawing sketches from December. Here’s a selection!

Janey was the life model at this Tuesday’s session, and she brought her dog along! It was fun to do quick gestures of the dog while also capturing her lovely poses.

Andy was modelling at this week’s life drawing. He held some great poses, including one where he played the guitar. As he was actually playing the guitar rather than pretending to, I feel the final drawing has real movement.

Moving for work has meant I’ve had to search for another life drawing class … thankfully this last week I found one! It’s a great little group and the model this week, Helen, came up with some lovely poses. It’ll be good to get back into regular classes again.

A few weeks ago I began working as a character and storyboard artist on an animated feature film called Spiked. I’ve been drawing a lot but of course I’m not able to share what I’m working on yet, so here’s a little doodle I drew today!doodles_01

One of the last times I was up in Edinburgh I sketched these at the museum in Chambers Street. Though I took no notes on colour at the time, thankfully National Museums Scotland has a searchable database – it’s fantastic for research.

While watching The Sound of Music again recently I was struck by the scene where Mother Abbess sings ‘Climb Ev’ry Mountain’. I decided to do a tone/composition study because the lighting and cinematography of the scene is so lovely.

When Maria enters the room, it’s very dark. The lighting is harsh and dramatic, and all that’s highlighted are the faces. Maria spends a lot of time with her back turned and her head bent. As the song begins Mother Abbess moves closer to the window, bringing more light into the scene. Maria follows, until she is also lit by the window.

The shots at the beginning, while Maria and Mother Abbess are talking, are fairly short and change position frequently – much like Maria’s answers. Once Mother Abbess sings, the cuts slow.

I began with rough but quite detailed studies. However I became aware I was focusing more on the poses and acting than I’d wanted to, so I did the latter images with a broader brush.



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